Jupiter, Venus and the Moon

Babak A. Tafreshi

I received an SMS from my father at 5.34am today telling me to look at the heavens and see Jupiter and Venus so close together. The last time he told me to look at the stars was 31 years ago as I sat on his lap, just before he became the “property of the Government of Malaysia as the Inspector-General of Police.

I saw this phenomenon last Sunday, and pointed the planets out to my 3 year-old son. I never realised the two heavenly bodies have come closer to each other since then. If you look out there, Venus is the brighter than the other. If you look to the left of Jupiter, you’d be able to see Spica, the brightest star in the constellation of Virgo. However, it is being outclassed by the two planets for now.

After last night, the two planets are now traveling apart. However, come September 6th, the slender crescent moon will join these two in making your sunset spellbinding.

I hope the new hotspots the Department of Environment spotted both in Malaysia and Indonesia will not spoil this show.

Yes..and the answer is…

GO!

After a short discussion, the wife has agreed that someone should babysit the children when I go to Redang, since she’ll return the day after I’d leave. Okay, time to book a place on the trip.

Achieving target…

At the onset of this year, I vowed to do 50 dives this year. I’ve only done 24.

My wife’s finally confirmed her trip to Beijing. 12th thru 16th of September. I’ll be going to Tioman 9th thru 11th, hopefully to do 10 dives. Now the problem is an instructor friend of mine is organising a trip to Redang island. Even there I can do another 10 dives. But my wife’ll be away during then. Who’s to look after the kids?

Repulse trip, hopefully I can log another 6 dives. Then I would have achieved my 50-dives year…excluding my planned trip to Pulau Payar and Mataking.

Problem-solving time…

USS Lagarto (SS-371)

There’s been a legal wrangle between the US Government and divers in Thailand who found and solved the final mystery of the submarine USS Lagarto (SS-371), that was reportedly sunk by the Japanese in the Gulf of Thailand on the 3rd May 1945. The US Government says it is a war wreck and no one should be allowed to dive it and charges the Thai divers as “grave-robbers.”

Did the sub carry gold bullion? Are divers going to retrieve skulls and bones and hang them up on the dive shop’s wall?

Do US laws apply to non-US citizens?

Try telling that to the Brits whom have been diving the HMS Prince of Wales and the HMS Repulse. They’re not supposed to dive there.

Sketch of the wreck of the USS Lagarto

One Diver Less (Update)

This is an update of my earlier posting: One Diver Less

The guy died of poor health. The Rhode Island Medical Examiner’s office said that Stephen Hardick died as a result of “saltwater drowning associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to cirrhosis of the liver, cardiomegaly and urolithiasis.”

Cardiomegaly is the medical term for enlargement of the heart and urolithiasis refers to mineral deposits or “stones” in the urinary tract.

The Rhode Island Medical Examiner’s office told CDNN that Stephen Hardick died as a result of “saltwater drowning associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to cirrhosis of the liver, cardiomegaly and urolithiasis.”

Cardiomegaly is the medical term for enlargement of the heart and urolithiasis refers to mineral deposits or “stones” in the urinary tract.

The Rhode Island Medical Examiner’s office told CDNN that Stephen Hardick died as a result of “saltwater drowning associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to cirrhosis of the liver, cardiomegaly and urolithiasis.”

Cardiomegaly is the medical term for enlargement of the heart and urolithiasis refers to mineral deposits or “stones” in the urinary tract.

Hardick’s wife, Kay, said that her husband had not been feeling well recently, however, they did not think his condition was serious.

The Marine Safety Office, a division of the U.S. Coast Guard is also investigating the accident and has reported that Hardick’s scuba diving equipment was functioning properly.

$70 A Barrel

It’s time for the government to review its petrol-subsidy policy. Instead of the government forking out money to help the rakyat, the oil companies should do this out of their fat coffers.